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Reflections on the Cuban International Conference on Hygiene and Epidemiology: Building Bridges of Cooperation with Latin America

By HENRY LOUIS TAYLOR JR. Published December 19, 2016 Henry Louis Taylor Jr. School of Architecture and Planning Cuban International Conference on Hygiene and Epidemiology “The neighborhood…should be the crucial entry point for policy-making and heal …

The East Side of Buffalo has Sold!

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Why should we trust you? Clinton’s big problem with young black Americans

Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor In the 1990s, Democrats helped shift the national conversation away from systemic racism. If the country’s first black president could not disrupt the racial status quo, what can we expect Hillary Clinton to accomplish? You alwa …

Baton Rouge: A Divided City

No, Baton Rouge is not burning. Baton Rouge is a city divided by many fault lines. A single street divides the city’s predominately white and black communities. North Baton Rouge, where Alton Sterling was killed, is under developed relative to south Ba …

In Baltimore and Across the Country, Black Faces in High Places Haven’t Helped Average Black People

This year marks the 50th anniversary of many of the most significant events of the Black Freedom Struggle of the 1960s. Two years ago, we celebrated the March on Washington; last year we recognized the 1964 Civil Rights Act that ended Jim Crow aparthei …

How Flint, Ferguson and Baltimore are all connected

Flint, Ferguson, New Orleans and Baltimore — cities now inseparable from the national news stories centered there — became calamities for separate reasons. One was a natural disaster (made worse by human error), another a wholly man-made crisis. The tw …

Reflections on Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Dream

On Monday, January 18, 2016, the pundits and talking heads will be telling us about Martin Luther King’s Dream and what he would think about the United States today. A careful re-reading of King’s 1963 “I Have a Dream” speech and his 1968 book, Where D …

Neighborhoods Matter

  In the United States, we are conditioned to view racism through individual dispositions, situational frameworks and/or the practices of specific institutions. Rarely, if ever, do we see the association between the day-to-day struggles of working …

How We Get Free

  On April 12, 1865, the American Civil War officially came to end when the Union Army accepted the unconditional surrender of the Confederacy on the steps of a courthouse in Appomattox, VA. The Union Army, led by two hundred thousand black soldie …

The Long Struggle for Black Liberation

In studies of the black freedom struggle, there is a tendency to think of each movement in that struggle as a separate and distinct entity.  While each phase in the struggle for black liberation has its own history, the black struggle for liberation wi …

Academics and Researchers Will Lead the Way in Cuba

  I have visited Cuba once a year since the summer of 1999. Over the decades, to many Americans, Cuba has been an intriguing and mysterious place. The establishment of diplomatic relations and the easing of travel restrictions will lift that shrou …

The Four Horsemen of Structural Racism

The dramatic response to the killing of Michael Brown raises the theoretical question, “What is the meaning of Ferguson in this Age of Neoliberalism?”  While much has been written about the Brown shooting, we seek to dive deeper,  and examine the commu …